Close filters
No results were found for the filter!

Sturgeon caviar

The roe from the sturgeon is known as one of the most expensive food around the world and of course almost everybody has heard of the best caviar in the world, the Beluga caviar. Real caviar is salted sturgeon roe, which has to mature several weeks before it becomes a delicacy. On the other hand fish eggs from other species are actually not called caviar like Tobiko or Masago which is used on Sushi dishes. These fish eggs are noticeably not so expensive (depending on sort 3 – 100 £/kg).

Where caviar comes from?

In former days most of the caviar came from Persia (Caspian Sea) or Russia (Siberia) where the sturgeon roe was salted and exported worldwide. The colour from genuine caviar varies from golden-brown to dark grey (except: Almas caviar from the albino sturgeon which is almost yellow). Nowadays the largest sturgeon farms are settled in Italy, China and Uruguay where 90% of the caviar comes from.

How do you serve caviar?

The best way to serve caviar is to keep it cold in a bowl with ice and spooning it out from a jar with a spoon made of mother of pearl. Be careful not to contaminate the delicious sturgeon roe with a metallic spoon. Keep it simple and do not mix caviar with ingredients which have a strong flavour. And please, don’t use lemon – never ever! Combine caviar with white bread (or blinis) which is topped with cream or low fat yogurt. Caviar can be served also with baked potatoes and butter as well.

Why is caviar so expensive?

Compared to former days when caviar was only avaible from wild sturgeon the fish eggs nowadays are affordable. This is possible because of the numerous modern sturgeon farms which are producing excellent caviar meanwhile. Nevertheless the price for caviar varies from 1.000 – 8.500 £ per kg depending on type and grade. For example the Beluga fish can be harvested when the sturgeon is in the age of 15 to 20 years. That means also several years of care and risk without guarantee of an income for the farmer. Of course sturgeons like the Acipenser Baerii (Siberian Caviar) is mature in 5 – 6 years and this is one of the reasons why it costs „only“ 800 – 1.200 £ per kg.

Sturgeon caviar The roe from the sturgeon is known as one of the most expensive food around the world and of course almost everybody has heard of the best caviar in the world, the Beluga caviar... read more »
Close window

Sturgeon caviar

The roe from the sturgeon is known as one of the most expensive food around the world and of course almost everybody has heard of the best caviar in the world, the Beluga caviar. Real caviar is salted sturgeon roe, which has to mature several weeks before it becomes a delicacy. On the other hand fish eggs from other species are actually not called caviar like Tobiko or Masago which is used on Sushi dishes. These fish eggs are noticeably not so expensive (depending on sort 3 – 100 £/kg).

Where caviar comes from?

In former days most of the caviar came from Persia (Caspian Sea) or Russia (Siberia) where the sturgeon roe was salted and exported worldwide. The colour from genuine caviar varies from golden-brown to dark grey (except: Almas caviar from the albino sturgeon which is almost yellow). Nowadays the largest sturgeon farms are settled in Italy, China and Uruguay where 90% of the caviar comes from.

How do you serve caviar?

The best way to serve caviar is to keep it cold in a bowl with ice and spooning it out from a jar with a spoon made of mother of pearl. Be careful not to contaminate the delicious sturgeon roe with a metallic spoon. Keep it simple and do not mix caviar with ingredients which have a strong flavour. And please, don’t use lemon – never ever! Combine caviar with white bread (or blinis) which is topped with cream or low fat yogurt. Caviar can be served also with baked potatoes and butter as well.

Why is caviar so expensive?

Compared to former days when caviar was only avaible from wild sturgeon the fish eggs nowadays are affordable. This is possible because of the numerous modern sturgeon farms which are producing excellent caviar meanwhile. Nevertheless the price for caviar varies from 1.000 – 8.500 £ per kg depending on type and grade. For example the Beluga fish can be harvested when the sturgeon is in the age of 15 to 20 years. That means also several years of care and risk without guarantee of an income for the farmer. Of course sturgeons like the Acipenser Baerii (Siberian Caviar) is mature in 5 – 6 years and this is one of the reasons why it costs „only“ 800 – 1.200 £ per kg.